NIAGARA 2014

NIAGARA 2014

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YOKOHAMA 2014

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http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=series&pk=41682&cid=367&concordeid=CSDPL

Democracy cuts across several disciplines, domains, subjects and areas, including political science, sociology, media studies, education, intercultural/multicultural studies, cultural studies and other related themes. Increasingly, it would appear that traditional forms of democracy are being critiqued and questioned, and this is the basis for this book series entitled Critical Studies in Democracy and Political Literacy. We presently have three titles in process to be published in 2012, and are interested in receiving more proposals at this time.

Why do so few people vote? What is political engagement? How does education intersect with democracy and political literacy? What can be learned from interdisciplinary studies on democracy? How do we cultivate political literacy? What is the relevance of elections in light of war, poverty, discrimination, social inequalities, etc.? What are the alternatives to the traditional electoral, representative, party-politics models that have characterized our societies? Is the mainstream media holding government to account, disseminating propaganda or fuelling the need to pacify the population? How do international systems, approaches and realities related to democracy compare, and what can we learn from others? These are some of the questions that are addressed through this book series.

Seeking to fill an important gap in the literature, this book series takes on the theme of democracy in a multi-/inter-disciplinary, comprehensive, and critical way. Some books have democracy in the title but do not make it the focus, and often books that address more directly, for example, multiculturalism, media studies, or school reform may delve into the area of democracy without fully deconstructing what it is, how it functions, how people can shape and intersect with it, and how it is used (or misused) to distort power relations, which is at the base of teaching, learning and action.

Such a book series seeks authors, voices and perspectives to more concisely and critically explore the meaning and essence of democracy within contemporary realities, either from theoretical, conceptual and/or empirical perspectives. Some of the leading research in the field indicates that the scope, depth and quality of educational materials available is, however, limited, and can lead to a relatively apolitical, non-critical understanding and assessment of what democracy is, and what it should be. Critical analyses, perspectives and resources offering a broader range of understanding of the multiple, nuanced and complex realities of democracy is, therefore, becoming more apparent.

Thus, a broader range of materials specifically tailored to teacher-education and scholars within the education field is desirable. Similarly, the overlapping and interdisciplinary nature of the study of democracy bleeds naturally into the areas of media studies, sociology, political science, peace studies, multiculturalism, feminist studies, and cultural studies, etc., all of which have a natural and inextricable relationship to and within education.

Producing books that could assist, shape and influence teaching and learning is a primary objective of this series, and an equally important objective relates to producing critical scholarship that would fill the gap between a limited, static, uncritical, thin appreciation of democracy and a more robust, critical, multi-dimensional, epistemologically complex, thicker version of democracy.

POTENTIAL BOOKS

Books should be in the area of 110,000 words, and would be crafted to be accessible, critical and related to a range of folks in the educational field, especially in teacher education, foundations, educational administration, policy and leadership, and educational reform, and other relevant areas.

SUBMISSIONS

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please send to me the following as an initial step:

1)  Names and coordinates of the authors

2)  Type of Book

3)  Tentative title of book

4)  Tentative table of contents of book

5)  200-word biographies for the editors or main authors

6)  500-word overview on focus of the book + the conceptual framework

7)  Potential audience (i.e., specific courses or areas of interest)

8)  Timeframe to complete the book

9)  Other pertinent information

 

Paul R. Carr

Département des sciences de l’éducation

Université du Québec en Outaouais

prcarr@gmail.com

PETER LANG PUBLISHING 

CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

BOOK SERIES: Critical Perspectives on Power, Identity, and Whiteness

Series Editors: Paul R. Carr, Virginia Lea, & Darren E. Lund

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=series&pk=41705&cid=367&concordeid=CMPW


In countries where the dominant language is English, such as the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom—and in the rest of Western Europe—corporate, militaristic capitalism, neoliberalism, and increasing racial-ethnic, religious, and linguistic diversity are increasingly associated with growing inequality. This reality is reflected in the uneven quality of schools, where the majority teaching population is largely comprised of White middle class people, while the student body is increasingly diverse, both across and within school districts. In this context, the need to contextualize, understand, and critique
hegemonic forms of Whiteness that constitute privilege and power is becoming fundamental to the mission of teaching and learning.

There are currently widespread calls for the need to acknowledge diversity in teacher education programs, formal elementary and secondary school curriculum, pedagogical practices, and educational policy development. However, even the best intentions are not always followed with tangible and meaningful outcomes.

The major institutions in a democratic, multicultural society should place value on different forms of knowledge, beliefs, and practices. They should give space to discourses that contribute to socioeconomic, political, and environmental equity and justice. They should encourage debate and critique. From this perspective, this book series seeks to engage readers, learners, teachers, parents, researchers, scholars, community activists, and members of the broader public interested in a critical multicultural dialogue on the complex intersections of power, identity, and whiteness. The series aims to link theory and practice, and in so doing, further our ability to problematize key societal and educational concerns related to whiteness. The series editors align themselves with the view that taking action for transformative change in and through education, in the spirit of what Paulo Freire called conscientization, is the role of educators
who seek to address the needs of all their students.

These are some of the questions we will be addressing in this book series:

  • How do we engage in critical discussions related to power, privilege, identity, and Whiteness when many multicultural frameworks of knowing and doing dissuade us from such work?
  • How can we embark on this project in a way that places the emphasis on meaningful interaction over gut reactions of guilt, anger, and shame??
  • How can we connect Whiteness to other intersecting and pivotal forms of being, marginalization, and identity?? How can those of us who are categorized as White make sure that a dialogue about Whiteness pays particular attention to the perspectives of people of color, long marginalized by whiteness? How does the series ensure that people of color may train the critical lens of lived experience on Whiteness

Through the hegemonic process, White people, both consciously and unconsciously, have sought to assert their superiority, to claim their right to greater incomes, wealth, power, and privilege—in other words, to place themselves at the center and/or in positions of leadership. Looking beyond the superficial mantra of a color-blind society, how can an inter-/trans-disciplinary analysis of the Whiteness project lead to teaching and learning that strives for a more resolute and sustained critique of neoliberal, capitalist education??How can the series prepare students to become active contributors to a more equitable, socially just, and caring society?

Interested contributors to this book series are kindly asked to submit the following to the editors:

  • a draft title of a proposed book
  • a 500-word summary of the book, including a brief discussion of the theoretical/conceptual framework
  • a 300-word statement on the focus of the book, intended audience, and any other relevant information
Paul R. Carr
Département des sciences de l’éducation
Université du Québec en Outaouais

paulr.carr@uqo.ca

Virginia Lea
Faculty of Education
University of Wisconsin (Stout)

leav@uwstout.edu

Darren E. Lund
Education
University of Calgary

dlund@ucalgary.ca

PUBLISHER: INFORMATION AGE PUBLISHING

http://www.infoagepub.com/series/Counter-Hegemonic-Democracy-and-Social-Change

BOOK SERIES EDITORS: Paul R. Carr (Université du Québec en Outaouais) & Gina Thésée (Université du Québec à Montréal)

The word “democracy” is increasingly attached to an array of concepts, themes and political and social realities and visions, yet there are currently a number of groups, movements, interests and actors around the world who are contesting the normative, hegemonic meaning and manifestation of formal democracy. Many people do not see their interests served by electoral, representative democracy, that which concerns political parties, voting and tightly controlled electoral processes. Rather, there is visible concern in many quarters with not only the formal process of how elections are shaped and governments are formed but, also, with the political, economic, cultural, social and militaristic outcomes of such institutionalized configurations. There is widespread cynicism, decreasing voter participation, the general sentiment of disenfranchisement and marginalization, and increasing levels of resistance and mobilization in the form of alternatives to the formal “democratic” model, which could be characterized as “counter-hegemonic democracy”. Counter-hegemonic democracy concerns lived realities inside of as well as outside of the formal political vacuum, touching on how people seek to build a more resilient, deeper, thicker, more critically engaged and meaningful democracy. Some examples could by the mass anti-war, pro-environment, Occupy, World Social Forum and other social movements that have sought to remove some governments and make others more accountable, or to make the world bodies that frame international politics more aligned with the needs of the masses that do not control the levers of power. There are also many other movements that start and cultivate causes through social media, or which seek some form of change at the local level. While often omitted from the mainstream media, many people are not perturbed from seeking social and political change outside of the formal strictures and structures of power, often influencing them as well as carving out terrain for those not considered within the strictly defined and formalized elite decisionmaking circles. This book series connects with this notion of counter-hegemonic democracy, and seeks out debates, ideas, concerns, examples and proposals that extend and construct knowledge within an inter- and multi-disciplinary vantage-point, including sociology, political science, political economy, economics, education, cultural studies and other connected areas. The books in this series will speak to educators, researchers, scholars, and students interested in democracy, political sociology, multicultural education, social movements, decolonization, media studies and peace studies as well as other connected areas.

POTENTIAL BOOKS

Books should be in the area of 100,000 words, and would be crafted to be accessible, critical and related to a range of folks in the educational field, especially in teacher education, foundations, educational administration, policy and leadership, and educational reform, and other relevant areas.

SUBMISSIONS

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please send to me the following as an initial step:

1)  Names and coordinates of the authors

2)  Type of Book

3)  Tentative title of book

4)  Tentative table of contents of book

5)  200-word biographies for the editors or main authors

6)  500-word overview on focus of the book + the conceptual framework

7) Potential audience (i.e., specific courses or areas of interest)

8) Timeframe to complete the book

9) Other pertinent information

CONTACT:

Paul R. Carr

Département des sciences de l’éducation

Université du Québec en Outaouais

prcarr@gmail.com

 

Gina Thésée

Département de didactique

Université du Québec à Montréal

thesee.gina@uqam.ca

cropped-vancouver-photo.jpgThis landmark book represents the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in Canada from an impressive line-up of leading scholars and activists. The burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness will benefit richly from this book’s timely inclusion of the insights of Canadian scholars, educators, activists and others working for social justice within and through the educational system, with implications far beyond national borders. Over 20 leading scholars and activists have contributed a diversity of chapters offering a concerted scholarly analysis of how the complex problematic of Whiteness affects the structure, culture, content and achievement within education in Canada. Contributors include James Frideres, Carl James, Cynthia Levine-Rasky, and Patrick Solomon. The book critically examines diverse perspectives, contexts, and the construction and application of societal and institutional practices, both formal and informal, that underpin inequitable power relations and disenfranchisement. Its relevance extends beyond the Canadian context, as those in other global settings will find abundant and poignant lessons for their own transformative work in education with a particular focus on social justice. Naming Whiteness and White identity is a political project as much as an intellectual engagement, and the co-editors of this collection must be commended for creating the space for such naming to take place in public and academic discourses. Is it noteworthy to acknowledge that both Paul and Darren are White, and that they are overseeing this work on Whiteness? I believe that it is, not because others cannot write about the subject with clarity and insight, as is clearly evident in the diverse range of contributors to this book. Rather, naming their positions as White allies embracing a rigorous conceptual and analytical discourse in the social justice field is an important signal that White society must also become intertwined in the entrenched racism that infuses every aspect of our society. As Paul and Darren correctly point out, race is still a pivotal concern for everything that happens in society, and especially in schools. Excerpt from the Foreword by George J. Sefa Dei , Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology and Equity Studies, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)The Great White North? provides a timely and important mode of addressing and examining the contradictions of Whiteness, and also challenging its insinuation into the very pores of the Canadian social universe. While the context of the book is distinctly Canadian, there are urgent messages here on race and anti-racism for the international community. Carr and Lund have provided educators with a vibrant contribution to the critical anti-racist literature. This is a book that needs to be put on reading- lists across the disciplines! Peter McLarenProfessor, Graduate School of Education and Information StudiesUniversity of California at Los Angeles. Sense Publishers.

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In this provocative collection of essays with a distinctly critical and nuanced approach to how democracy is taught, learned, understood, and lived, authors from four continents share their visions on how democracy needs to be cultivated, critiqued, demonstrated, and manifested throughout the educational experience. The collective concern is how we actually do democracy in education. The essays argue that democracy must be infused in everything that happens at school: curriculum, extra-curricular activities, interaction with parents and communities, and through formal organization and structures. One of the book’s central questions is: Are educators merely teaching students skills and knowledge to prepare them for the world of work, or is education more about encouraging students to thrive within a pluralistic society? This book reveals that democracy is an ethos, an ideology, a set of values, a philosophy, and a complex and dynamic terrain that is a contested forum for debate. From seasoned veterans to emerging scholars, these writers challenge the idea that there is only one type of democracy, or that democracy is defined by elections. Using a range of theoretical, conceptual, and methodological approaches, each essay makes a compelling case for how education can advance a more critical engagement in democracy that promotes social justice and political literacy for all. Diverse examples illustrate the theme of doing democracy. With its numerous models for teaching and learning to encourage critical thinking and engagement, this book is certain to be an invaluable resource to educators, researchers, students, and anyone with a passion for democratic ideals. Peter Lang Publishing.

Youth Culture, Education and Resistance: Subverting the Commercial Ordering of Life is a ground-breaking collection of essays that illustrate how youth culture has the potential to build solidarity amongst teachers, activists, scholars, and practitioners for the purposes of confronting the dominant ideological doctrine influencing life at today’s historical juncture—emblemized through neoliberalism—as well as building a society free from oppressive social formations. Several leading international scholars and educators provide empirically and theoretically rich portraits of youth challenging the commercialized status quo inside and outside K-12 classrooms. They also illustrate how cultural manifestations of youth speak directly against the social actors who continually vilify youth as the source of their own marginalization and the world’s suffering and misery. Youth Culture, Education and Resistance: Confronting Commerialization and Neo-Liberalism continues the important legacy of critical pedagogy by remaining defiant in the face of what seems an unimpeachable foe. Given the daunting task faced by critical educators, it is heartening to see Brad Porfilio and Paul Carr bringing together such a relentlessly creative and courageous group of critical educators, who refuse to give up the struggle to bring social justice to education and the world-at-large, a world increasingly eviscerated of social services on behalf of finance capital. —Peter McLaren, UCLA ((from the Foreword) Youth Culture, Education and Resistance by Brad Porfilio and Paul Carr is a timely and powerful intervention in contemporary literature on youth, education, and neo-liberalism. Collectively, the authors and editors open up the discussion around young people today, offering us a new and richer language to think about the specific kinds of inequalities young people face today—and how they are being resisted. —Greg Dimitriadis, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (from the Afterword) What I find valuable about this volume is the way in which the authors look beyond tinkering with the policies of current or outgoing leaders. As this volume emphasizes, the real hope is to be found where it always has been found: in the resistance of youth. Our masters criminalize youth for the same basic reasons that they marginalize and racialize others: to divide and subjugate. I strongly recommend this volume to teachers and academics interested in looking beyond our immediate and localized concerns. —Douglas Fleming, University of Ottawa The contributors to this volume present both a theoretically complex analysis of neo-liberalism and the negative consequences for education, and a pedagogically rich portrayal of what is possible possible if we only placed people before profits. Engaging, critical, and ground-breaking.—David Hursh, University of Rochester. Sense Publishers

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A volume in Critical Constructions: Studies on Education and Society Series Editor: Curry Stephenson Malott, Queens College/CUNY Who should read this book? Anyone who is touched by public education – teachers, administrators, teacher-educators, students, parents, politicians, pundits, and citizens – ought to read this book. It will speak to educators, policymakers and citizens who are concerned about the future of education and its relation to a robust, participatory democracy. The perspectives offered by a wonderfully diverse collection of contributors provide a glimpse into the complex, multilayered factors that shape, and are shaped by, institutions of schooling today. The analyses presented in this text are critical of how globalization and neoliberalism exert increasing levels of control over the public institutions meant to support the common good. Readers of this book will be well prepared to participate in the dialogue that will influence the future of public education in this nation – a dialogue that must seek the kind of change that represents hope for all students. As for the question contained in the title of the book–Can hope audaciously trump neoliberalism?–, Carr and Porfilio develop a framework that integrates the work of the contributors, including Christine Sleeter and Dennis Carlson, who wrote the forward and afterword respectively, that problematizes how the Obama administration has presented an extremely constrained, conservative notion of change in and through education. The rhetoric has not been matched by meaningful, tangible, transformative proposals, policies and programs aimed at transformative change. There are many reasons for this, and, according to the contributors to this book, it is clear that neoliberalism is a major obstacle to stimulating the hope that so many have been hoping for. Addressing systemic inequities embedded within neoliberalism, Carr and Porfilio argue, is key to achieving the hope so brilliantly presented by Obama during the campaign that brought him to the presidency. Information Age Publishing.

cropped-vancouver-photo.jpgThe public debate on democracy is often constrained within an alienating and disenfranchising narrative of opinion polls, campaign platforms, personalities and formal structures that generate legislation, all of which surreptitiously seems to trickle down to the classroom. Paul R. Carr asserts that democracy must be cultivated in a vigorous, conscientious, meaningful and critical way in and through education in order for it to have salience in society, especially within a neoliberal conjuncture that promotes limited space for epistemological interrogation of how we understand and are engaged in maintaining and/or transforming our societies. Building on the critical pedagogical work of Paulo Freire, Joe L. Kincheloe, and others, this book develops a framework for understanding how a thicker democratic education can be conceptualized and implemented in schools. The book aims to move the focus on democracy away from voting, and place it more properly on the importance of social justice and political literacy as a way of understanding what democracy is and, importantly, how to make it more relevant for all of society. The book concludes that another democracy is possible, as well as being desirable, and that education is the fundamental intersection in which it must be developed. Peter Lang Publishing


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